Skateboarding Shoes

When Will They Make Better Skateboarding Shoes?

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I have been troubled with the notion that skateboarding shoes need much improvement.  I am realizing that a good skateboard obsession requires new skate shoes just about as often as you need a new deck.  What’s up with skateboard shoes lately?  I have seen others try all kinds of different shoes but at the end of the day the sport wears out your shoes faster than Fred Flintstone’s feet wear out from braking in his floorless car.

There has been much improvement in terms of skateboard technology such as lighter and more reliable decks, polyurethane wheels, and frictionless bearings, but where are we with grip tape and shoes?

I spoke with my sons who are competitive skaters and I suggested that I develop a pair of shoes that came with the grip tape on the sole (imagine this on a wood top board – the grip on the shoes, not on the deck?)

Skateboarding Shoes

Brand New Vans Shoe Torn After Only 4 Minutes!

I’m sure the combination of gritty sand on your soles and braking after doing tricks is the main cause for premature sole wear but what about other wear and tear on other parts of the shoe? (see photo below)?

I’m sure Vans, DC, and now Nike can come up with a winning formula for making better skateboard shoes.  Oh yeah almost forgot to mention that we don’t see the problem of worn skateboarding shoes with longboarders, only with those who skate short decks.

 

 

 

 

When will they make better skateboarding shoes?

How to Paint a Skateboard

How to Paint a Skateboard Professionally at Home

Hey folks if you are trying to figure out how to paint a skateboard professionally jump in the blog and comment or criticize in the comments section below.  This article is meant to solve the problem of those decks you trip over in the shed that the kids don’t want anymore.

I’ve read several similar articles but they don’t go into detail more than “sand board, then prime”.  I wanted to provide more detail as to what sandpaper to use, etc.  Please consider that these tips are for the hobbyist and produce as much a “professional” result as possible, but do not equate to a professional skateboard manufacturer’s methods.  The point being that skateboards, in order to gain speed and agility, require the lightest weight possible in order to defy physics.  Believe it or not, painting a deck in your backyard can produce great looking results, but manufacturers take great lengths to keep the manufacturing process as controlled as possible in order to apply the minimum required amount of paint.  Applying too much paint will increase the deck’s weight and even if you were to increase the weight by only one gram, that would be all too noticeable to a professional skater.  I’m sure Tony Hawk and Shaun White are past the stage of backyard shed projects.

 

how to paint a skateboard

The “Before” Shot

how to paint a skateboard

The Other “Before” Shot

Unless you can guarantee that you will not sand off too much of the underside art to the detriment of the wood, and apply the exact same amount of paint as previously applied, please ensure that if you are repainting the deck of a pro skater that you set the expectation.

 

Recommendations

First you’ll need a decent workspace, whether it be a shed or garage or even outdoors.  If you intend to work outdoors, careful when spray painting in a breeze.

 

You’ll also need some work clothes.  You will get dirty and unless your clothes and workspace has been previously approved by your partner, spouse, or girlfriend, you could find yourself in trouble and ultimately skating alone.

 

You’ll need to have adequate clean up materials such as a wet cloth to wipe excess paint, a paint area covered by a sheet of cardboard or dropcloth.

 

Also, though these steps took me about an hour to complete, the whole process took about three days to complete, allowing for the primer and paint to dry sufficiently between steps.  Also, sanding by hand is not recommended.  I highly recommend the use of an electrical sander as it will sand the surface uniformly without creating valleys or carve lines in.

 

Before beginning, do make sure that the board you are restoring is in fact repairable and that the plies have not separated.

how to paint a skateboard

Unrepairable Deck – The Plies Have Separated

 

Tools & Equipment for How to Paint a Skateboard

  • An X-Acto or surgical knife
  • A putty knife – a metal one, not a plastic one
  • A blow dryer or paint heat gun
  • 40 grit sand paper
  • 150 grit sand paper
  • 220 grit sand paper
  • An electric sander – with protective glasses and a dust mask
  • Wood filler
  • Acrylic aerosol primer
  • Acrylic aerosol paint
  • Aerosol lacquer or Varathane
  • Mom, dad, or the babysitter’s permission and approval before proceeding

 

Steps to Prepare for How to Paint a Skateboard

  1.  Take a photo of the “before” deck top and bottom for sake of posterity.  If you can, weigh the board so you have a reference as to the weight of the removed paint and the paint you’re to add.
  2. Using the knife, lift the grip tape at the end of the board and begin peeling

    how to paint a skateboard

    Remove the Grip Tape

  3. If required, use the heat gun or blow dryer to warm the grip tape glue in order to facilitate the peeling process.  Removing the grip tape should take between three and seven minutes.
  4. Using the sander and 40 grit paper, proceed to remove the graphic from the bottom of the deck.  Be patient as this can take 20 minutes.  Apply a lot of pressure on the sander but avoid digging or carving into the wood with the edge of the sander.

    how to paint a skateboard

    Sanding the Deck

  5. Once the graphic has been removed, re-sand with a 150 grit paper in order to smooth out the wood.  This step should take no more than five minutes.
  6. Repair the board as needed using a carpenter quality wood filler paste.  Wood filler is available in many colours and you can even collect some of the sawdust from the previous step and mix it in.  Apply liberal amounts of filler and don’t worry about getting it perfect.  You are not icing a cake.  The important point to remember is not to over work the filler.  Put it on, let it dry, then you will re-sand.  This step should take five minutes.  Then wait 24 hours before sanding the filler.
    how to paint a skateboard

    Fill in the Pressure Cracks

    how to paint a skateboard

    Some Repairs are Needed – Apply Wood Filler

    how to paint a skateboard

    Apply Wood Filler to the Deck

  7. Re-sand the repaired spots with 150 grit paper.

    how to paint a skateboard

    The Wood Filler After Sanding – Looks Pretty Good

  8. Using a damp (not wet) cloth, wipe any excess sawdust from the deck and wait about fifteen minutes.  Next is the real how to p
  9. For the primer, ensure you have properly mixed it.  Apply the primer to each surface of the deck.  I used a paint brush but try finding an aerosol primer.  The trouble with brushes is that you may apply too much primer in certain areas.
  10. how to paint a skateboard

    Apply the Primer

  11. Wait for the primer to dry (about 30 minutes) and re-sand with 150 grit paper.  Do not resand the primer off to the point you will see the wood grain.  Just provide a light sanding to remove any blistering or bubbles from the primer.  You may see the wood through the primer, this is ok.
  12. Before painting the deck, again wipe extra primer dust from the deck with a damp cloth and again wait fifteen minutes before painting.
  13. Shake the aerosol primer can for at least two full minutes.  Hold the can about ten inches away from the deck and spray very lightly until the paint covers the entire surface.  Aerosol cans cause drips and bubbles so if this occurs, wait for drying and resanding, do not overpaint or try to fix wet paint.
    how to paint a skateboard

    Getting Ready to Spray the First Coat

    how to paint a skateboard

    First Coat Applied

    how to paint a skateboard

    First Coat Applied

  14. Wait 24 hours.  Seriously.  This is the most crucial step to allow the paint to dry.
  15. Sand the painted deck with 220 grit paper and again wipe with damp cloth and wait fifteen minutes

 

Thanks for reading How to Paint a Skateboard

 

 

skateboard dock shoes

My New Shoes

I go through a pair of skate shoes about every three weeks.  My parents are getting annoyed but I got me a summer job mowing lawns so I’ve been pretty much buying all my equipment this summer.

skateboard dock shoes

 

Jersey City man admits to spray painting graffiti all over Downtown, cops say

JERSEY CITY – A 23-year-old city man has admitted to spray painting graffiti on nine Downtown locations on or near Newark Avenue, including two schools, police say.

The Storms Avenue man was arrested on Jan. 19 and charged with one count of criminal mischief for the nine instances of graffiti, according to public-safety spokeswoman Carly Baldwin. The charge is a third-degree crime.

The graffiti – in two different variations, both referencing a feminine hygiene product – was found in late December on Morlees clothing store on Newark Avenue, St. Mary High School on Third Street, Lucky 7 bar on Second Street and more.

Graffiti on the French American Academy school on Third Street cost $500 to remove, according to police.

The 23-year-old, who police say was arrested in August 2014 on similar charges, told police he was sorry and would help clean up his latest street art. He told police he is “not allowed” at Lucky 7 anymore because a worker there caught him tagging the building, according to a police report.

“Graffiti is a quality-of-life issue that we take seriously,” Public Safety Director Jim Shea said in a statement. “We hope this sends a message that we will aggressively pursue anyone who vandalizes private or public property.”

The nine instances of graffiti are among dozens that occurred in the area in late December and last weekend. Baldwin said police are on the lookout for other graffiti artists who may be responsible for the rest.

If you wish to report any graffiti, call the city Resident Response Center at 201-547-4900.

Terrence T. McDonald may be reached at tmcdonald@jjournal.com. Follow him on Twitter @terrencemcd. Find The Jersey Journal on Facebook.

Article source: http://www.nj.com/hudson/index.ssf/2015/01/jersey_city_cops_nab_man_suspected_of_tagging_down.html

A Detroit Collage: How a Graffiti Artist, Apparel Company and Nonprofit Are …

Hofgartner started Art Road about a decade ago once she realized how the art curriculum was failing in classrooms. Art, she said, had changed her own life: She grew up drawing and has had her art displayed in library showings. “For me, [art] gave me an outlet and a sense of accomplishment,” she said. “So for myself, I want to give that same sense of creativity, nurturing that creative spirit and [sense of accomplishment] in these students.”

Article source: http://www.theroot.com/articles/culture/2015/01/a_detroit_collage_how_a_graffiti_artist_apparel_company_and_nonprofit_are.html

Jersey City man admits to nine graffiti tags Downtown

JERSEY CITY — A 23-year-old city man has admitted to spray painting graffiti on nine Downtown locations on or near Newark Avenue, including two schools, police say.

The Storms Avenue man was arrested on Jan. 19 and charged with one count of criminal mischief for the nine instances of graffiti, according to public-safety spokeswoman Carly Baldwin. The charge is a third-degree crime.

The graffiti — in two different variations, both referencing a feminine hygiene product — was found in late December on Morlees clothing store on Newark Avenue, St. Mary High School on Third Street, Lucky 7 bar on Second Street and more.

Graffiti on the French American Academy school on Third Street cost $500 to remove, according to police.

The 23-year-old, who police say was arrested in August 2014 on similar charges, told police he was sorry and would help clean up his latest street art. He told police he is “not allowed” at Lucky 7 anymore because a worker there caught him tagging the building, according to a police report.

“Graffiti is a quality-of-life issue that we take seriously,” Public Safety Director Jim Shea said in a statement. “We hope this sends a message that we will aggressively pursue anyone who vandalizes private or public property.”

The nine instances of graffiti are among dozens that occurred in the area in late December and last weekend. Baldwin said police are on the lookout for other graffiti artists who may be responsible for the rest.

If you wish to report any graffiti, call the city Resident Response Center at 201-547-4900.

Terrence T. McDonald may be reached at tmcdonald@jjournal.com. Follow him on Twitter @terrencemcd.

Article source: http://www.nj.com/jjournal-news/index.ssf/2015/01/jersey_city_man_admits_to_nine.html

Uncovering more graffiti

A conservator working this week at the historic Graffiti House in Brandy Station has for the first time uncovered Civil War-era writing on the ground floor of the structure.

The newest uncovered writing appears to be from Union soldiers, apparently during the period the house was used as part of the headquarters of Union Gen. Henry Prince, said Foundation President Jim McKinney.

Since buying the house in 2002, the foundation has been working to uncover and preserve graffiti written on the plaster walls within the structure. Until now, all of the graffiti had been located in rooms on the second floor, McKinney said.

Architectural Conservator Chris Mills of Christopher Mills Conservation Services in Massachusetts said he thought he had found all the graffiti which had survived inside the historic structure.

But during his last visit to Brandy Station, Mills said he checked out the bathroom which had been added under the  stairway in the 1930′s. There he found evidence of more original plaster which had been covered by drywall, layers of wallpaper and numerous coats of paint.

Returning to the house this week, Mills uncovered the new section of plaster bearing graffiti.

McKinney said the new writing appears to be from the Union occupation of the house between November 1863 and May of 1864.

Included on the uncovered plaster is a reference to a “light infantry” group, an unusual reference, McKinney said.

There are also mentions of a unit from Ohio and a five-pointed star, which Mills said seems to have been drawn with some sort of paint — also unusual for the house.

Most of the graffiti uncovered upstairs was written with charcoal from the house’s fireplace or pencil, he said.

“We don’t know much about it yet — we just uncovered it yesterday (Wednesday),” Mills said.

McKinney said the foundation will now begin the painstaking process of researching the new references and names uncovered on the plaster.

Much of the research is done by BSF members and former foundation presidents Bob Luddy and Bob Jones, McKinney said.

McKinney said the foundation has already identified more than 50 soldiers from both sides of the conflict who had signed the walls.

“First you have to interpret what the names are,” McKinney said. “The Park Service has a data base for the war which is very helpful. If you have the unit to go with the names it makes it a lot easier.”

Mills said he will probably leave the site this week after stabilizing the newly uncovered section of plaster and using a endoscope to look inside the other walls downstairs to see if there is any more plaster.

“The great thing about this is that it is first generation, first hand,” Mills said. “There is no speculation; there is no interpretation. Their signatures on the wall means they were definitely here.”

The Graffiti House will remain closed as the work continues through this weekend. It will reopen Jan. 30. The facility is open to the public Friday through Sunday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. There is no charge for admission, but donations are welcome.

For more information, call the Graffiti House at (540) 727-7718.

 

 

 

 

 

Article source: http://www.dailyprogress.com/starexponent/news/uncovering-more-graffiti/article_296e665a-a332-11e4-8f43-03f73cfe0cdf.html

Nonprofit Helps Graffiti Artists Turn Their Work Into Cash

Bobby Rodriguez started tagging when he was 13, spray painting illegal graffiti art from San Pedro to San Bernardino. Life in that world led to other illicit activity and several arrests.

“I got really involved with the criminal aspect,” he said. “I don’t want to go into much detail…but there’s basically nothing I haven’t done.”

Today, at 25, Rodriguez is an aspiring commercial artist, thanks in part to the efforts of a Santa Monica-based nonprofit called Streetcraft L.A.

Streetcraft co-founder Jonathan Mooney calls it a social venture, designed to show talented but troubled kids like Rodriguez that their art can be a source of legitimate income.

“There’s this misconception that graffiti is gang related,” Mooney said, adding that most is not. “It’s often creative young people who don’t have a different channel for their creativity.”

The channels they do choose can get them into trouble, especially since graffiti can be treated as a felony, he said.

“There have been young people who have gone away for lifetime sentences as a result of three strikes, three graffiti strikes,” Mooney said.

Mooney and a partner, Emmet Ashford-Trotter, founded Streetcraft L.A. about two years ago. It operates out of a small showroom on Main Street in Santa Monica. Mentors teach teens and young adults – recruited from the streets and continuation schools – how to turn their art into a sellable product.

Read the full story at KPCC

Article source: http://ww2.kqed.org/news/2015/01/24/nonprofit-helps-graffiti-artists-turn-their-work-into-cash

How Girls in Afghanistan Are Skateboarding Their Way to Empowerment

Skateistan(KABUL, Afghanistan) — Young girls in Afghanistan are empowering themselves through an unexpected sport: skateboarding.

Non-profit organization Skateistan is cruising through the country’s streets, getting children to sign up for their skateboarding lessons followed up with educational time in classrooms — and it’s all for free.

The unconventional charity was founded by Australian Oliver Percovich, who wanted to do something about the lack of proper role models for working street children, Skateistan’s communications director Rhianon Bader told ABC News.

“We want the girls to see one another as role models instead of the war lords who would drive around town with a car load of men who are waving guns around,” Percovich told the Daily Mail.

But why skateboarding?

Simply because it’s one of the few, if any, sports that are socially acceptable for Afghanistan girls to participate in.

“Traditional sports and activities like bike riding, [soccer] and kite flying are really popular in Afghanistan, but they’re only appropriate for boys,” Bader told ABC News. “Skateboarding didn’t exist in the Afghan context at all, so there weren’t any social constraints for girls to take part in skateboarding.”

Skateistan serves both girls and boys, but the organization has gone to especially great lengths for its girls.

“We’ve done everything to make our program culturally appropriate to reach as many girls as possible,” Bader told ABC News. “In Afghanistan, girls can only be around other girls, so we host all-girls classes taught only by female teachers. We have a separate safe facility for them and provide free, safe transportation for them.”

Skateistan is currently helping over 800 children pursue their dreams in the war-torn country, the Daily Mail reported.

“We are reaching out to kids internally displaced in camps, poor working street children and even middle class kids,” Bader told ABC News. “It’s really important to have this mixing of different backgrounds to build up a civil society that has been devastated by decades of war.”

Their new outdoor skate park is the first in the war-torn country that’s seen more than 21,000 killed in past 11 years.

Skateistan’s “Back to School” program attached with its skateboarding classes also helps their students get enrolled or re-enrolled in the country’s public school system.

The non-profit also has a youth leadership program, where older students can transition into significant full-time roles as instructors, teachers and speakers.

One student in the program, Madina Saidy, 16, is now a teacher and recently represented Skateistan in Colombia at the United Nations Habitat’s World Urban Forum, where she spoke in front of 25,000 participants on urban equity, Bader told ABC News.

This was Saidy’s first trip outside of Afghanistan.

“It’s amazing to see a girl from Afghanistan who has been working since eight years old to come this far,” Bader said. “She basically taught herself English, and now she’s an amazing role model and leader who has even flown internationally.”


Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Article source: http://www.mycentraloregon.com/2015/01/20/how-girls-in-afghanistan-are-skateboarding-their-way-to-empowerment/