Skateboarding Shoes

When Will They Make Better Skateboarding Shoes?

skateboard shoes,skate shoes,dc shoes,nike skateboarding shoes,vans shoes,skateboarding shoes
I have been troubled with the notion that skateboarding shoes need much improvement.  I am realizing that a good skateboard obsession requires new skate shoes just about as often as you need a new deck.  What’s up with skateboard shoes lately?  I have seen others try all kinds of different shoes but at the end of the day the sport wears out your shoes faster than Fred Flintstone’s feet wear out from braking in his floorless car.

There has been much improvement in terms of skateboard technology such as lighter and more reliable decks, polyurethane wheels, and frictionless bearings, but where are we with grip tape and shoes?

I spoke with my sons who are competitive skaters and I suggested that I develop a pair of shoes that came with the grip tape on the sole (imagine this on a wood top board – the grip on the shoes, not on the deck?)

Skateboarding Shoes

Brand New Vans Shoe Torn After Only 4 Minutes!

I’m sure the combination of gritty sand on your soles and braking after doing tricks is the main cause for premature sole wear but what about other wear and tear on other parts of the shoe? (see photo below)?

I’m sure Vans, DC, and now Nike can come up with a winning formula for making better skateboard shoes.  Oh yeah almost forgot to mention that we don’t see the problem of worn skateboarding shoes with longboarders, only with those who skate short decks.

 

 

 

 

When will they make better skateboarding shoes?

How to Paint a Skateboard

How to Paint a Skateboard Professionally at Home

Hey folks if you are trying to figure out how to paint a skateboard professionally jump in the blog and comment or criticize in the comments section below.  This article is meant to solve the problem of those decks you trip over in the shed that the kids don’t want anymore.

I’ve read several similar articles but they don’t go into detail more than “sand board, then prime”.  I wanted to provide more detail as to what sandpaper to use, etc.  Please consider that these tips are for the hobbyist and produce as much a “professional” result as possible, but do not equate to a professional skateboard manufacturer’s methods.  The point being that skateboards, in order to gain speed and agility, require the lightest weight possible in order to defy physics.  Believe it or not, painting a deck in your backyard can produce great looking results, but manufacturers take great lengths to keep the manufacturing process as controlled as possible in order to apply the minimum required amount of paint.  Applying too much paint will increase the deck’s weight and even if you were to increase the weight by only one gram, that would be all too noticeable to a professional skater.  I’m sure Tony Hawk and Shaun White are past the stage of backyard shed projects.

 

how to paint a skateboard

The “Before” Shot

how to paint a skateboard

The Other “Before” Shot

Unless you can guarantee that you will not sand off too much of the underside art to the detriment of the wood, and apply the exact same amount of paint as previously applied, please ensure that if you are repainting the deck of a pro skater that you set the expectation.

 

Recommendations

First you’ll need a decent workspace, whether it be a shed or garage or even outdoors.  If you intend to work outdoors, careful when spray painting in a breeze.

 

You’ll also need some work clothes.  You will get dirty and unless your clothes and workspace has been previously approved by your partner, spouse, or girlfriend, you could find yourself in trouble and ultimately skating alone.

 

You’ll need to have adequate clean up materials such as a wet cloth to wipe excess paint, a paint area covered by a sheet of cardboard or dropcloth.

 

Also, though these steps took me about an hour to complete, the whole process took about three days to complete, allowing for the primer and paint to dry sufficiently between steps.  Also, sanding by hand is not recommended.  I highly recommend the use of an electrical sander as it will sand the surface uniformly without creating valleys or carve lines in.

 

Before beginning, do make sure that the board you are restoring is in fact repairable and that the plies have not separated.

how to paint a skateboard

Unrepairable Deck – The Plies Have Separated

 

Tools & Equipment for How to Paint a Skateboard

  • An X-Acto or surgical knife
  • A putty knife – a metal one, not a plastic one
  • A blow dryer or paint heat gun
  • 40 grit sand paper
  • 150 grit sand paper
  • 220 grit sand paper
  • An electric sander – with protective glasses and a dust mask
  • Wood filler
  • Acrylic aerosol primer
  • Acrylic aerosol paint
  • Aerosol lacquer or Varathane
  • Mom, dad, or the babysitter’s permission and approval before proceeding

 

Steps to Prepare for How to Paint a Skateboard

  1.  Take a photo of the “before” deck top and bottom for sake of posterity.  If you can, weigh the board so you have a reference as to the weight of the removed paint and the paint you’re to add.
  2. Using the knife, lift the grip tape at the end of the board and begin peeling

    how to paint a skateboard

    Remove the Grip Tape

  3. If required, use the heat gun or blow dryer to warm the grip tape glue in order to facilitate the peeling process.  Removing the grip tape should take between three and seven minutes.
  4. Using the sander and 40 grit paper, proceed to remove the graphic from the bottom of the deck.  Be patient as this can take 20 minutes.  Apply a lot of pressure on the sander but avoid digging or carving into the wood with the edge of the sander.

    how to paint a skateboard

    Sanding the Deck

  5. Once the graphic has been removed, re-sand with a 150 grit paper in order to smooth out the wood.  This step should take no more than five minutes.
  6. Repair the board as needed using a carpenter quality wood filler paste.  Wood filler is available in many colours and you can even collect some of the sawdust from the previous step and mix it in.  Apply liberal amounts of filler and don’t worry about getting it perfect.  You are not icing a cake.  The important point to remember is not to over work the filler.  Put it on, let it dry, then you will re-sand.  This step should take five minutes.  Then wait 24 hours before sanding the filler.
    how to paint a skateboard

    Fill in the Pressure Cracks

    how to paint a skateboard

    Some Repairs are Needed – Apply Wood Filler

    how to paint a skateboard

    Apply Wood Filler to the Deck

  7. Re-sand the repaired spots with 150 grit paper.

    how to paint a skateboard

    The Wood Filler After Sanding – Looks Pretty Good

  8. Using a damp (not wet) cloth, wipe any excess sawdust from the deck and wait about fifteen minutes.  Next is the real how to p
  9. For the primer, ensure you have properly mixed it.  Apply the primer to each surface of the deck.  I used a paint brush but try finding an aerosol primer.  The trouble with brushes is that you may apply too much primer in certain areas.
  10. how to paint a skateboard

    Apply the Primer

  11. Wait for the primer to dry (about 30 minutes) and re-sand with 150 grit paper.  Do not resand the primer off to the point you will see the wood grain.  Just provide a light sanding to remove any blistering or bubbles from the primer.  You may see the wood through the primer, this is ok.
  12. Before painting the deck, again wipe extra primer dust from the deck with a damp cloth and again wait fifteen minutes before painting.
  13. Shake the aerosol primer can for at least two full minutes.  Hold the can about ten inches away from the deck and spray very lightly until the paint covers the entire surface.  Aerosol cans cause drips and bubbles so if this occurs, wait for drying and resanding, do not overpaint or try to fix wet paint.
    how to paint a skateboard

    Getting Ready to Spray the First Coat

    how to paint a skateboard

    First Coat Applied

    how to paint a skateboard

    First Coat Applied

  14. Wait 24 hours.  Seriously.  This is the most crucial step to allow the paint to dry.
  15. Sand the painted deck with 220 grit paper and again wipe with damp cloth and wait fifteen minutes

 

Thanks for reading How to Paint a Skateboard

 

 

skateboard dock shoes

My New Shoes

I go through a pair of skate shoes about every three weeks.  My parents are getting annoyed but I got me a summer job mowing lawns so I’ve been pretty much buying all my equipment this summer.

skateboard dock shoes

 

Slates supports skateboard charity

If it weren’t for skateboarding, James Stewart might be making a very different kind of music. The vocalist for Edmonton punk band Slates said the sport was crucial in helping him learn how to be a bit of a bad ass and introducing him to lots of new sounds.

“When I grew up, my gateway into Metallica and punk rock and SNFU was through skateboarders and through old Thrasher magazines,� he said. “A lot of the music I listened to I discovered through old skateboarding videos.�

It’s appropriate, then, that the band is playing a Right to Skate fundraiser. The Saskatoon non-profit provides skateboard equipment to less fortunate children.

Slates is currently on a Canadian tour in support of its third album Taiga, which was released in February. Stewart said it’s a gruelling experience because Canada is such a huge country, but it’s been great to catch up with old friends along the way. They’ve also had unique experiences, like getting to play in a studio/pinball arcade, playing a sold-out show in Thunder Bay and jumping in the Atlantic Ocean.

“That was pretty awesome coming from the Prairies. But there were jellyfish everywhere, it was kind of terrifying,� said Stewart.

Luckily, no one got stung.

“We kind of just wimped around and shrieked a lot.�

Slates started in late 2008 from the remains of several other Edmonton bands. Recently, the band’s original guitarist left to pursue his other passion kung fu. Lee Klippenstein joined the band on bass and original member Stefan Duret switched to guitar.

“That changed the dynamic a ton. We all got super excited by having that switch,� said Stewart.

They did an intense month-long tour of Europe just after Klippenstein joined the band. It was good experience, but it was difficult for the new member to take ownership of songs he had no part in creating. When they got back, all four members got together to write Taiga, which Stewart calls a dark, wintertime record. Creating the record was an immersive experience for the bandmates, who spent 10 months writing its 10 songs. Slates recorded Taiga on analog tape over six days in Chicago with engineer Steve Albini, who has worked with Nirvana and The Stooges. Stewart said there was a unique pressure working with Albini, but it got more relaxed as they got to know him.

When Slates finished the album it was like waking up from a dream, Stewart said, because the whole process was so intense.

“We were like ‘What the hell did we just do? Was this a huge mistake? Are these songs even good?’�

Now that the band is on the road, Slates has time to really enjoy the music. Stewart said it’s so much fun to play the new songs, especially now that all four members feel a connection to the music.Saturday, 8 p.m.

The Underground Cafe

Tickets $10

Box office: Riversdale Delicatessen, Underground Cafe and at the door

smckay@thestarphoenix.com

Article source: http://www.thestarphoenix.com/Slates+supports+skateboard+charity/10076766/story.html

Slates support skateboard charity

Slates

with These Estates, Fire Next Time, Slow Down Molasses

Right to Skate Fundraiser

When: Saturday, 8 p.m.

Where: The Underground Cafe

Tickets $10

Box office: Riversdale Delicatessen, Underground Cafe and at the door

If it weren’t for skateboarding, James Stewart might be making a very different kind of music. The vocalist for Edmonton punk band Slates said the sport was crucial in helping him learn how to be a bit of a bad ass and introducing him to lots of new sounds.

“When I grew up, my gateway into Metallica and punk rock and SNFU was through skateboarders and through old Thrasher magazines,” he said. “A lot of the music I listened to I discovered through old skateboarding videos.”

It’s appropriate, then, that the band is playing a Right to Skate fundraiser. The Saskatoon non-profit provides skateboard equipment to less fortunate children.

Slates is currently on a Canadian tour in support of its third album Taiga, which was released in February. Stewart said it’s a gruelling experience because Canada is such a huge country, but it’s been great to catch up with old friends along the way. They’ve also had unique experiences, like getting to play in a studio/pinball arcade, playing a sold-out show in Thunder Bay and jumping in the Atlantic Ocean.

“That was pretty awesome coming from the Prairies. But there were jellyfish everywhere, it was kind of terrifying,” said Stewart. Luckily, no one got stung. “We kind of just wimped around and shrieked a lot.”

Slates started in late 2008 from the remains of several other Edmonton bands. Recently, the band’s original guitarist left to pursue his other passion kung fu. Lee Klippenstein joined the band on bass and original member Stefan Duret switched to guitar.

“That changed the dynamic a ton. We all got super excited by having that switch,” said Stewart.

They did an intense month-long tour of Europe just after Klippenstein joined the band. It was good experience, but it was difficult for the new member to take ownership of songs he had no part in creating.

When they got back, all four members got together to write Taiga, which Stewart calls a dark, wintertime record. Creating the record was an immersive experience for the bandmates, who spent 10 months writing its 10 songs.

Slates recorded Taiga on analog tape over six days in Chicago with engineer Steve Albini, who has worked with Nirvana and The Stooges. Stewart said there was a unique pressure working with Albini, but it got more relaxed as they got to know him.

When Slates finished the album it was like waking up from a dream, Stewart said, because the whole process was so intense.

“We were like ‘What the hell did we just do? Was this a huge mistake? Are these songs even good?’ ” Now that the band is on the road, Slates has time to really enjoy the music. Stewart said it’s so much fun to play the new songs, especially now that all four members feel a connection to the music.

smckay @thestarphoenix.com

Article source: http://www.thestarphoenix.com/entertainment/Slates+support+skateboard+charity/10078207/story.html

Bike, skateboard helmets recalled

Credits: HEALTH CANADA

QMI AGENCY

Thousands of bicycle and skateboard helmets from Capix Evo and Capix Jr Evo have been recalled because of a manufacturing defect.

The defect may cause cracks to appear near the rivets that secure the chinstrap, which poses a potential safety hazard, Health Canada says.

The Capix Jr Evo helmets were sold in the colour combinations of black and green, as well as white and purple.

The Capix Evo helmets were sold in black, blue, red and white.

FGL Sports Ltd. initiated the recall.

Neither Health Canada nor FGL Sports Ltd. have received any complaints or reports of injuries.

Approximately 8,684 helmets were sold across Canada at Sport Chek, Sports Experts, Intersport and S3 stores between January and June.

Anyone who owns a helmet should return it to the place of purchase for a refund or exchange.


Article source: http://www.sunnewsnetwork.ca/sunnews/business/archives/2014/07/20140731-091115.html

Sectarian graffiti daubed on Catholic church in Northern Ireland

Sectarian graffiti described as “a disgusting and appalling act of vandalism” has been daubed on the wall of a Catholic church in Northern Ireland.

Twenty hours after a series of coordinated racist attacks directed at immigrants in Belfast, a church in County Tyrone has become the latest target of rising hate crime in the region.

The Police Service of Northern Ireland said it was treating the slogans painted outside St Patrick’s Catholic church in Dungannon as a hate crime.

SDLP local councillor Denise Mullen said: “Whoever is responsible for this should be ashamed. To carry out a thuggish act like this on a place of worship is cowardly and, really, it is an attack on the community.

“Whoever is responsible for this vandalism does not represent the good people of Dungannon, and I would urge anyone with information about the incident to contact police.”

The graffiti included the letters UVF – Ulster Volunteer Force – which was scrawled in luminous green on the side of the church.

In Belfast the PSNI have confirmed that eight separate attacks on the homes and cars of immigrant families on Monday night in loyalist areas in the east of the city were orchestrated.

PSNI Supt Mark McEwan said: “A group of between 10 to 15 people were involved, some of them masked, and there was a level of orchestration.”

One of the victims, who had “Romanians out” painted on her home in Bloomfield Avenue, is actually Slovakian and said she would not be forced out.

Rosie Lakatosova said: “Just yesterday I walked around the area and there was nothing. I am scared and frightened and I don’t know why they would do this. This is a very good street.”

Article source: http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2014/jul/30/sectarian-graffiti-catholic-church-northern-ireland

Graffiti spreads from designated Missoula wall, prompting calls for removal

A designated wall for graffiti art near the California Street footbridge has spread past its legal bounds onto public property, and that has some residents and officials asking that the wall be removed.

Others, however, don’t see a problem with the expanding graffiti-covered sidewalk on Missoula’s Riverfront Trail and across the bridge.

Rob Scheben, a crime prevention officer for the Missoula Police Department and director of the Graffiti Task Force, said the city hasn’t received any reports about graffiti from the area. The wall is on private property, he said.

“The city doesn’t have any say of what goes on that wall,” he said.

Scheben said he thinks the area hasn’t changed since the wall was built and designated as a graffiti-friendly zone, and said his task force takes care of graffiti at the footbridge in the same manner as elsewhere in Missoula.

A person guilty of illegal graffiti-making is charged with criminal mischief, he said. If the damage is less than $1,500, it’s a misdemeanor; property damage more than $1,500 is considered a felony.

Ellen Buchanan, director of the Missoula Redevelopment Agency, said graffiti has been an issue around the California Street footbridge for years. She said the graffiti keeps spreading farther from the wall and onto the Riverfront Trail, which is part of the Missoula Parks and Recreation trail system.

Buchanan said allowing graffiti on the wall is contributing to its spread.

“Both the Graffiti Volunteer Task Force and Parks try to stay as ahead of it as they can, but the volumes are just overwhelming,” she said.

Emily Bentley, a city councilwoman for Ward 3, said the spread of graffiti has been a problem for a while.

She said the north-facing wall also creates an unsafe area because it is high and narrow, so the area is hidden from view. She said although the task force has helped with Missoula’s graffiti problem, the wall should be knocked down.

“In theory, it’s a good idea to have a wall that’s legal and safe for people to use, but in practice it’s not working, and it’s making the bridge intimidating on the Westside and the Riverfront neighborhood,” Bentley said.

Sgt. Travis Welsh of the Missoula Police Department said graffiti long has been an issue throughout Missoula, particularly on bridges and underpasses.

He said the Orange Street underpass is one example, and also anywhere there’s a blank wall. This could be a business, residence or Dumpster, Welsh said.

Graffiti becomes a problem when people report it, or when someone sprays graffiti on another’s property, he said. But it’s treated differently if the property owner allows it.

“What people do on their own property, as long as it’s not illegal, is their own business,” he said.

Welsh said reports of graffiti have dropped in the past several years, and he attributes that to the Graffiti Task Force response. If the police department hears a report of something illegal, they notify the Task Force who then cleans it up.

The Task Force is doing a good job of scrubbing off or painting over the graffiti, he said.

“It’s not necessarily a citywide problem, I mean you’ve got to add a little perspective,” Welsh said.

Article source: http://missoulian.com/news/local/graffiti-spreads-from-designated-missoula-wall-prompting-calls-for-removal/article_7113f130-1851-11e4-b31d-0019bb2963f4.html

Graffiti a growing problem in Newmarket

Newmarket Era

Police are attempting to target taggers following a rash of graffiti incidents in southeast Newmarket earlier this month.

York Regional Police is investigating several incidents of tagging on public and private property in the area, including College Manor, Silken Laumann and Mulock drives, Stonehaven, McBean and Bayview avenues and Heddle Crescent.

The Magna Centre, College Manor Park, a garage, a Canadian Pacific Railway cube van, Canada Post mailboxes and hydro and utility boxes were vandalized. Some of the incidents are believed to have taken place between July 20 and 21.

Based on the style and some of the tagging, it appears the incidents are connected, York Const. Laura Nicolle said. “We are still investigating, but, at this time, we do not have any suspects.”

School bus driver and Newmarket resident Chris Nicitpoulos, who regularly trains colleagues in the area, says the neighbourhood is typically very quiet.

“It’s a good neighbourhood,” she said, while parked near a tagged mailbox. “I don’t usually see this around here.”

The town recently released a report on the cost of graffiti removal within the municipality. According to the document, the town spent $28,038 on graffiti removal on municipally owned property in 2013, up from $22,710 in 2012. Newmarket has budgeted $20,000 for graffiti removal this year.

There are three main factors blamed for the hike: a decision to remove paint in areas that are not normally addressed within the municipality, excessive tagging and ongoing vandalism of public art along the Tom Taylor Trail.

“Officers are frequently called to complaints of damage to property from local homeowners, business owners and building contractors who report mischief to their property involving graffiti,” Nicolle said. “Taggers, as they are commonly referred to, place a marking or name on various types of property. They believe that these markings are artistic, however, their actions cause thousands of dollars of damage to the property of innocent victims and taxpayers.”

In the most recent cases, the names NSK, CMG, SNARE and CREW ONE are prevalent.

Ward 2 councillor candidate Doug Crosse submitted several pictures of the damage to The Era and says graffiti is becoming more prolific in the area in recent years.

“(It) just seems to be really piling up on post, hydro and cable (boxes) — and now bigger targets,” he said.

Others agree. Ward 1 councillor candidate Wanda Cena — who provided pictures of tagging damage at Magna Centre’s east entrance and a few other areas of her ward — says there’s plenty of graffiti on display in that section of town, as well as the Main Street area.

“In Stonehaven, there’s been an increase in vandalism … and other disgusting acts,” she said.

Residents can take several measures to protect their properties. Exterior areas should be well-lit and the use of video surveillance can be considered. Pictures of the damage should be snapped and incidents must be reported to police, Nicolle said.

“Graffiti has a negative effect on our communities in many ways,” she said. “It contributes to reduced property value, a decline in commercial sales, increased crime rates in affected areas, wasted tax dollars for clean up and decreased use and enjoyment of public facilities. It diminishes citizens’ feelings of safety and security.”

Anyone with information on the tagging can call police at 1-866-876-5423.

Melbourne takes unique approach to graffiti

St. John’s, Mount Pearl andto a lesser extent, Conception Bay South and others have been grappling for years about what to do about the graffiti and the vandals who are tagging or marking up private and public property.

Municipalities and private property owners have made requests for harsher penalties for those found guilty of damaging property with graffiti. There have been suggestions that those convicted also be required to pay the cost of restoring the property.

While we continue to struggle with a solution, such as a public space, there are some innovative graffiti approaches in the world. I discovered one during a recent vacation which included a five-day visit to Melbourne, Australia.

Melbourne has been ranked as the world’s most livable city for the past three years, and this came as no surprise during our visit to the city in late May.

One of Melbourne’s many features and tourist attractions is the series of lanes throughout the downtown.

The city is also famous for its street art, as we found when we discovered Hosier Lane on a Sunday afternoon.

The lane is one of many painted with the city’s blessing under its graffiti management plan.  

Melbourne’s plan distinguishes between graffiti or tagging on a wall with a marker or paint, and street art which is placed on walls and structures with the city’s approval.

The art in Hosier Lane was impressive. Even the dumpster belonging to one of the businesses was painted and blended into the lane.

The best part of the discovery was that we got to see an artist in action and then had an opportunity to talk with him.

Raphael is a student taking a year off and living in Melbourne and working as an au pair with a local family. He told us he paints every chance he gets and enjoys the freedom to practise his art in Melbourne.

Back home in France, he has to do his painting under the cover of darkness because it is illegal. He also told us that if you paint over someone’s work in France you may suffer some consequences from fellow painters.  

In Melbourne, it is different and your work usually stays in place for a few weeks before it is painted over, with no consequences.

He also told us paint is less expensive in Melbourne so he can spend more time on his painting than he can at home.     

While we were in the lane, a photographer was doing a photo shoot using the graffiti or street art as a backdrop for a model all dressed in white. As the city is famous for its street art, such a sight is likely very common.

Melbourne’s graffiti and street art also extends outside the city. During a train ride to Geelong, about an hour outside Melbourne, many of the miles of bridges, brick walls and buildings were also painted.

Providing spaces for street artists may not be the only solution to get rid of some of the vandalism and damage to property, but will provide an outlet for the more creative ones.  

Of course, Melbourne still has a graffiti problem and, like our cities and towns, spends public funds to clean properties.  

Our municipalities also allow controlled public painting so the Melbourne experience is an example of how to move forward with providing public spaces which could also become attractions.

As we left Hosier Lane, we gave Raphael some cash to help him buy paint for the next weekend’s project.

Joan Butler is a lifelong resident

of Kelligrews, Conception Bay South.

She can be reached by email

at joanbutler@ymail.com.

Article source: http://www.thetelegram.com/Opinion/Columnists/2014-07-31/article-3818512/Melbourne-takes-unique-approach-to-graffiti/1

Memorial Remembers Star Basketball Player Who Died From Skateboarding Fall

Top Features


CBSLA iPhone App
For iPhone and Android
textalerts180 Memorial Remembers Star Basketball Player Who Died From Skateboarding Fall

CBSLA Text Alerts
Back To School: Features, News  PhotosFollow Us On Twitter

CHINO HILLS (CBSLA.com) — Family and classmates bid a tearful farewell to an Inland Empire high school basketball star who died from an accident off the court.

A memorial for 17-year-old Nnamdi Okongwu was held Tuesday on the field at Chino Hills High School.

“Nnamdi … Nnamdi …” the teen’s father, Mike Okongwu, said while addressing mourners in the stands, before breaking into gut-wrenching sobs.

It was then that the teen’s aunt stepped in, saying he was a “very sweet, loving, caring child.”

Earlier this month, Nnamdi injured his head in a skateboarding accident. The high school senior wasn’t wearing a helmet.

Nnamdi was rushed to a hospital, where he recently died.

The star basketball player was one of the best in the state and was being recruited by several top colleges, his coach told the crowd.

“One thing I know about Nnamdi, that his teammates will never forget, is how often he forgot his basketball shoes to practice. And I’ll always remember those moments, how he would scramble to borrow someone else’s shoes right before practice,” Coach Steve Baik said.

Baik gave Nnamdi’s family the teen’s framed jersey.

A family friend told the crowd that Nnamdi’s mother was trying to start a fund to buy helmets for skateboarders.

“I don’t want any of you mothers to ever have to go through that. So, can you help me help this family, so we can give back a little bit?” the woman asked.

To help fund this endeavor, the family and school are holding a bingo fundraiser at noon Sunday in the high school’s gym. For more information, visit the Okongwu family’s Go Fund Me page.

RELATED STORIES:

Family Says High School Basketball Star Is Very Much Alive

Star High School Athlete Rushed To Hospital After Skateboarding Accident

Article source: http://losangeles.cbslocal.com/2014/07/29/memorial-held-for-star-high-school-basketball-player-who-died-from-skateboarding-fall/

‘Jews, the End is Near’, Says Graffiti in Rome

Rome’s mayor has denounced anti-Semitic graffiti and swastikas that have appeared across the city, The Associated Press (AP) reported on Tuesday.

Some of the graffiti referred to the escalating violence in Gaza and included taunts such as “Jews, the end is near.”

Rome Mayor Ignazio Marino offered his solidarity with Rome’s Jewish community and said the graffiti, which appeared near Jewish-owned businesses, was an “offense to all Romans.”

Marino also ordered the graffiti and swastikas removed, according to AP.

Jewish leaders, meanwhile, urged Rome police to find those responsible and punish them.

The head of Rome’s Jewish Community, Riccardo Pacifici, was quoted by AP as having said, “Rome cannot become like Paris where Jews are assaulted, synagogues are surrounded and where wearing the yarmulke is a concrete danger.”

Italian political leaders condemned the graffiti and the Vatican newspaper l’Osservatore Romano wrote Tuesday of the “abominable” new episode of anti-Semitism.

Six months ago, boxes containing pigs’ heads were sent to the Israeli embassy in Rome and the city’s synagogue.

A letter inside contained derogatory comments about the Holocaust and references to Theodor Herzl, considered to be the founder of modern political Zionism. Marino condemned this incident as well.

Anti-Semitism has been on the rise in Europe and has particularly reared its ugly head in the wake of Israel’s Operation Protective Edge in Gaza.

During the operation, there have been attacks on synagogues and Jewish businesses in France, as well as violent anti-Semitic demonstrations in Germany, where an imam in Berlin recently called on Muslims to “kill Zionist Jews.”

Article source: http://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/News.aspx/183502