Skateboarding Shoes

When Will They Make Better Skateboarding Shoes?

skateboard shoes,skate shoes,dc shoes,nike skateboarding shoes,vans shoes,skateboarding shoes
I have been troubled with the notion that skateboarding shoes need much improvement.  I am realizing that a good skateboard obsession requires new skate shoes just about as often as you need a new deck.  What’s up with skateboard shoes lately?  I have seen others try all kinds of different shoes but at the end of the day the sport wears out your shoes faster than Fred Flintstone’s feet wear out from braking in his floorless car.

There has been much improvement in terms of skateboard technology such as lighter and more reliable decks, polyurethane wheels, and frictionless bearings, but where are we with grip tape and shoes?

I spoke with my sons who are competitive skaters and I suggested that I develop a pair of shoes that came with the grip tape on the sole (imagine this on a wood top board – the grip on the shoes, not on the deck?)

Skateboarding Shoes

Brand New Vans Shoe Torn After Only 4 Minutes!

I’m sure the combination of gritty sand on your soles and braking after doing tricks is the main cause for premature sole wear but what about other wear and tear on other parts of the shoe? (see photo below)?

I’m sure Vans, DC, and now Nike can come up with a winning formula for making better skateboard shoes.  Oh yeah almost forgot to mention that we don’t see the problem of worn skateboarding shoes with longboarders, only with those who skate short decks.

 

 

 

 

When will they make better skateboarding shoes?

How to Paint a Skateboard

How to Paint a Skateboard Professionally at Home

Hey folks if you are trying to figure out how to paint a skateboard professionally jump in the blog and comment or criticize in the comments section below.  This article is meant to solve the problem of those decks you trip over in the shed that the kids don’t want anymore.

I’ve read several similar articles but they don’t go into detail more than “sand board, then prime”.  I wanted to provide more detail as to what sandpaper to use, etc.  Please consider that these tips are for the hobbyist and produce as much a “professional” result as possible, but do not equate to a professional skateboard manufacturer’s methods.  The point being that skateboards, in order to gain speed and agility, require the lightest weight possible in order to defy physics.  Believe it or not, painting a deck in your backyard can produce great looking results, but manufacturers take great lengths to keep the manufacturing process as controlled as possible in order to apply the minimum required amount of paint.  Applying too much paint will increase the deck’s weight and even if you were to increase the weight by only one gram, that would be all too noticeable to a professional skater.  I’m sure Tony Hawk and Shaun White are past the stage of backyard shed projects.

 

how to paint a skateboard

The “Before” Shot

how to paint a skateboard

The Other “Before” Shot

Unless you can guarantee that you will not sand off too much of the underside art to the detriment of the wood, and apply the exact same amount of paint as previously applied, please ensure that if you are repainting the deck of a pro skater that you set the expectation.

 

Recommendations

First you’ll need a decent workspace, whether it be a shed or garage or even outdoors.  If you intend to work outdoors, careful when spray painting in a breeze.

 

You’ll also need some work clothes.  You will get dirty and unless your clothes and workspace has been previously approved by your partner, spouse, or girlfriend, you could find yourself in trouble and ultimately skating alone.

 

You’ll need to have adequate clean up materials such as a wet cloth to wipe excess paint, a paint area covered by a sheet of cardboard or dropcloth.

 

Also, though these steps took me about an hour to complete, the whole process took about three days to complete, allowing for the primer and paint to dry sufficiently between steps.  Also, sanding by hand is not recommended.  I highly recommend the use of an electrical sander as it will sand the surface uniformly without creating valleys or carve lines in.

 

Before beginning, do make sure that the board you are restoring is in fact repairable and that the plies have not separated.

how to paint a skateboard

Unrepairable Deck – The Plies Have Separated

 

Tools & Equipment for How to Paint a Skateboard

  • An X-Acto or surgical knife
  • A putty knife – a metal one, not a plastic one
  • A blow dryer or paint heat gun
  • 40 grit sand paper
  • 150 grit sand paper
  • 220 grit sand paper
  • An electric sander – with protective glasses and a dust mask
  • Wood filler
  • Acrylic aerosol primer
  • Acrylic aerosol paint
  • Aerosol lacquer or Varathane
  • Mom, dad, or the babysitter’s permission and approval before proceeding

 

Steps to Prepare for How to Paint a Skateboard

  1.  Take a photo of the “before” deck top and bottom for sake of posterity.  If you can, weigh the board so you have a reference as to the weight of the removed paint and the paint you’re to add.
  2. Using the knife, lift the grip tape at the end of the board and begin peeling

    how to paint a skateboard

    Remove the Grip Tape

  3. If required, use the heat gun or blow dryer to warm the grip tape glue in order to facilitate the peeling process.  Removing the grip tape should take between three and seven minutes.
  4. Using the sander and 40 grit paper, proceed to remove the graphic from the bottom of the deck.  Be patient as this can take 20 minutes.  Apply a lot of pressure on the sander but avoid digging or carving into the wood with the edge of the sander.

    how to paint a skateboard

    Sanding the Deck

  5. Once the graphic has been removed, re-sand with a 150 grit paper in order to smooth out the wood.  This step should take no more than five minutes.
  6. Repair the board as needed using a carpenter quality wood filler paste.  Wood filler is available in many colours and you can even collect some of the sawdust from the previous step and mix it in.  Apply liberal amounts of filler and don’t worry about getting it perfect.  You are not icing a cake.  The important point to remember is not to over work the filler.  Put it on, let it dry, then you will re-sand.  This step should take five minutes.  Then wait 24 hours before sanding the filler.
    how to paint a skateboard

    Fill in the Pressure Cracks

    how to paint a skateboard

    Some Repairs are Needed – Apply Wood Filler

    how to paint a skateboard

    Apply Wood Filler to the Deck

  7. Re-sand the repaired spots with 150 grit paper.

    how to paint a skateboard

    The Wood Filler After Sanding – Looks Pretty Good

  8. Using a damp (not wet) cloth, wipe any excess sawdust from the deck and wait about fifteen minutes.  Next is the real how to p
  9. For the primer, ensure you have properly mixed it.  Apply the primer to each surface of the deck.  I used a paint brush but try finding an aerosol primer.  The trouble with brushes is that you may apply too much primer in certain areas.
  10. how to paint a skateboard

    Apply the Primer

  11. Wait for the primer to dry (about 30 minutes) and re-sand with 150 grit paper.  Do not resand the primer off to the point you will see the wood grain.  Just provide a light sanding to remove any blistering or bubbles from the primer.  You may see the wood through the primer, this is ok.
  12. Before painting the deck, again wipe extra primer dust from the deck with a damp cloth and again wait fifteen minutes before painting.
  13. Shake the aerosol primer can for at least two full minutes.  Hold the can about ten inches away from the deck and spray very lightly until the paint covers the entire surface.  Aerosol cans cause drips and bubbles so if this occurs, wait for drying and resanding, do not overpaint or try to fix wet paint.
    how to paint a skateboard

    Getting Ready to Spray the First Coat

    how to paint a skateboard

    First Coat Applied

    how to paint a skateboard

    First Coat Applied

  14. Wait 24 hours.  Seriously.  This is the most crucial step to allow the paint to dry.
  15. Sand the painted deck with 220 grit paper and again wipe with damp cloth and wait fifteen minutes

 

Thanks for reading How to Paint a Skateboard

 

 

skateboard dock shoes

My New Shoes

I go through a pair of skate shoes about every three weeks.  My parents are getting annoyed but I got me a summer job mowing lawns so I’ve been pretty much buying all my equipment this summer.

skateboard dock shoes

 

New Balance Numeric ‘Pinnytown’

Just before the winter took hold of the East Coast the New Balance Numeric team took a short trip to Boston and New York. Shot entirely on Red Digital Cinema and accompanied by the article in our April 2014 issue. Read the Red Winter article in its entirety.
Starring: Levi Brown, Tom Karangelov, Tom Knox, PJ Ladd, Arto Saari, Tyler Surrey, Jordan Taylor, and Jordan Trahan.

More New Balance Numeric:
A Place In The Sun
newsHIT Interview: Tyler Surrey Jordan Taylor

  1. Matt Meyerson:

    arto forever

  2. Monica Taylor Meche:

    Wow!!! So proud of you Jordan Trahan!!! Way to go. You and the group
    Of guys your with are amazing. Every little boys dream.

  3. Jake Todd:

    aha yo pretty sure jordan trahan did that noseblunt at hospital banks a few years ago in ride or die

  4. Pae Pae:

    yeah pj wow jordan and cant believe that that kickflip out of nose blunt was real and in new york wtf

  5. Nick Pappas:

    Dudes murdered the black NYC hubba!!!!

  6. Hilblaynner Ribeiro Barbosa:

    Oooooh

Article source: http://skateboarding.transworld.net/1000195632/videos/new-balance-numeric-pinnytown/

Proof Sheet: Alex Uncapher

Photos of skaters in the Twin Cities that Alex shot started popping up a few years ago and I was hyped. I didn’t really know him very well, but he was always around Familia and skating the streets and also DJing a lot of parties around town. As time went on, he started documenting a lot of the good times that were going down in the scene, and we started talking more about what we could do. We had some severe weather that knocked down a bunch of trees all over the city and he shot some of the sickest photos I’ve ever seen off of bumps and sidewalks over the damaged areas. He pretty much does it all, kills it when he skates, kills it when he shoots photos, and kills it when he DJs. It’s a lot of fun to have productive people around like that in the midwest, it’s needed.—Steve Nesser

Jake Nelson, frontside Smith grind.

How long have you been shooting skating and what got you into it?
I’ve been shooting skateboarding for about ten years, I started shooting right around when I started high school and had access to a decent camera I could borrow. I’ve been skateboarding and shooting it ever since.

Is there one photograph or photographer that inspired you to take up photography?
I couldn’t choose just one photo or photographer that inspired me to shoot, it was kind of just a natural thing that happened when I started skating. It’s almost just a weird feeling about wanting to document everything.

What’s the best and worst advice you’ve been given on photography?
Just keeping a camera on you at all times is probably some of the best advice I’ve received. You can’t shoot anything if you don’t have your camera! I knew a photographer who would always say, “Light it up like a Christmas tree,” just filling the entire place with a ton of lights from every direction. That phrase just kind of stuck with me for something not to do.

What do you like shooting besides skating? Any influences from non-skate photographers?
I think my favorite thing to shoot is skateboarding, but really anything with people outside. I also love to shoot a bunch of music and party stuff. I think most photo inspiration I have is actually from non-skate photographers or artists. A few favorites are Gregory Crewdson, Charlie White, Chris Cunningham, and Matthew Barney.

Do you have a favorite photo of your own?
I’m not sure if I could choose a favorite but the cherry on the spoon backside flip has to be up there. It’s probably one of the most iconic things in Minneapolis and it was kind of always a crazy daydream for anyone to skate it, so actually getting a photo on it makes me pretty hyped every time I look at it.

Ryan Yost, backside flip.

What’s the most interesting story behind one of your photos?
There’s a few but I think the back Smith on the ramp in the barn is a whole crazy situation. That ramp was just a rumor for years while growing up. After seeing some footage to prove that it was real and a couple years of trying to figure out someone who knew directions, I finally found them. We would head out into the middle of nowhere in Wisconsin, down a handful of country roads, get lost a million times, and eventually show up at a random abandoned barn. I was sure we were at the wrong place even when we stepped in. You had to climb up a wooden ladder to the second story, and then crawl under the deck of the ramp before you could even see it. It was beautiful, and one of the best ramps I’ve ever skated. Eventually word got out that we had been skating it and on a trip back into my hometown a couple years later I ran into an older guy in the skate scene who told me not to be surprised if me or my friends end up dead in the river if he catches us there. Definitely one of the more memorable spots I’ve shot at.

Jake Nelson, backside Smith grind.

What’s the best and worst part about shooting in Minnesota?
The best part is definitely the seasons. I know sunny and 70 every day is great, but I really love spring and fall here in Minnesota, the changing seasons and weather make for a bunch of photos that couldn’t happen everywhere else. Although the winters that last almost half the year and stay below freezing for weeks at a time are a nightmare. The good thing about the long winters here is they give a great excuse to get out of here and travel around.

How has living in Minnesota influenced you as a photographer?
I feel like living here has made me work a lot harder to get a cool shot, I can’t just go out any day in perfect weather and have a million dudes trying to shoot something gnarly, it’s more premeditated, each shot is its own little mission.

Have you had any photos published in print and does print matter to you?
I’ve had a handful of photos published and it’s always kind of a rush to see them in print but it’s not really the biggest priority to me. I think images that end up online usually get more exposure anyway.

What advice would you give to up and coming skate photogs?
Don’t put up every single photo you take, or tricks that were never a landed. I’ve seen a million skate photos that were obviously a bail or have horrendous timing to the point where you can’t tell what trick it could possibly be. Skateboarding yourself and knowing how the tricks work make all the difference in trying to get a good photo of it.

Do you prefer digital or film?
I definitely embrace the newer technology. I’ll always have a soft spot for some black and white film or some Polaroids, but for me I feel like the advantages of shooting digital have surpassed film.

What’s in your camera bag? Favorite piece of gear?
A Nikon D300s; 50, 35, 18-55, and 10.5mm lens, a few old Sunpaks and Vivitar flashes with Pocket Wizards, and a bunch of extra batteries! Sometimes I’ll swap out some of the flashes for a Mamiya RZ67 to shoot some Polaroids if I feel like going au naturale.

Who’s your favorite person to shoot and why?
I don’t think I’ve really had a bad time shooting skateboarding with anybody but if I’m giving shoutouts, Greg Clover, Ricky Nunn, Tom Rohrer, and Tabari Cook are a few of my favorites to shoot with, always down to go on a mission to get a photo and always killin’ it.

What’s your favorite skate photo of all time?
One of my favorites is a shot by Patrick O’Dell. It was a photo of Chet Childress doing a backside Smith grind in a bowl that was in the process of getting destroyed by a crazy backhoe. It’s pretty much rad in every way possible.

Your photography website:
alexuncapher.com

Check out some of Alex’s choice shots in the gallery below:


Aaron_Christensen_frontside_pivot.jpg


David_Jaimes_back_5050.jpg


David_Nelson_fakie_5-0.jpg


Gregg_Clover_360_flip.jpg


Gregg_Clover_back_smith.jpg


Hani_Shamat_pivot_fakie.jpg


Hendo_back_tail.jpg


Jake_Nelson_back_smith.jpg


Jake_Nelson_front_smith.jpg


Ricky_Nunn_taildrop.jpg


Ryan_Yost_backside_flip.jpg


T_Dunn_blunt_fakie.jpg


Tabari_Cook_nosebonk.jpg


Tom_Rohrer_backside_180.jpg


Tom_Rohrer_heelflip.jpg


Travis_Usselman_wallride_nollie_out.jpg

Self portrait.


Article source: http://skateboarding.transworld.net/1000195501/photos/proof-sheet-alex-uncapher/

Red Bull Curb Kings San Diego April 27

FIRST-EVER RED BULL CURB KINGS TO HIT SAN DIEGO’S BELMONT PARK
Open Sign-Ups On April 27  for Curb Competition!

Sunday, April 27 will mark the first-ever Red Bull Curb Kings taking place outside at San Diego’s historic oceanfront amusement grounds, Belmont Park. Giving local skateboarders the opportunity to showcase their creative skills on features similar to what’s found in major urban city streets, the course will consist of modified parking blocks and double-sided curbs. Registration begins on-site at 10 a.m. and the competition will be from 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Skateboarders 18 years or older ranging from amateurs to professionals are invited to participate, with no limits on the number of competitors. The competition will be judged in five-minute jam format heats, meaning the number of skateboarders participating per heat depends on the number of sign-ups.

Curb skateboarding is one of the most historical pieces to the progression of the sport, with many tricks learned and perfected on curbs prior to taking them to larger handrails and ledges. Practiced by generations past to present, curb skateboarding will always be part of the sport’s DNA and Red Bull Curb Kings is looking to crown the top local talent.

Seven-time Manny Mania champion Joey Brezinski will act as head judge. Competitors will be judged on style and creativity and top finalists will move on to the next heat. There will be a total of 6 Qualifying heats, that will determine the top 10 skateboarders that will head to the semi-finals. From the semi-final the top 5 skateboarders will head the final where they will go head-to-head with other finalists.
In partnership with action sports retailer Sun Diego, this year’s top three winners will receive a cash prize and an invitation to compete at Red Bull Triple Set this fall in San Diego. Catch the recap videos and photos on twskate.com!

Course preview:

  1. Hood Connor:

    We want @Richie Jackson!

  2. Ryan Walsh:

    This is guna be sick!

  3. Andrew Grabowski:

    please do more of these contests around the U.S! In upstate NY would be great!

  4. Kevin Lopez:

    fuckkkk im not in sd i would kill this!!!

  5. Woos Jelemee:

    I have a mean boardslide, I’m takin it.

  6. Chris Dunne:

    Damn all my favorite things to skate

  7. Mike Butler:

    Come to Proidence, RI

  8. Christobal McClarkington:

    Looks pish.

  9. Drew Miranda:

    Looks dope

Article source: http://skateboarding.transworld.net/1000195615/news/red-bull-curb-kings-san-diego-april-27/

These Mesmerizing GIFs Will Forever Change The Way You See Skateboarders

For most of the public, skateboarding is merely a hobby for those at the fringes of society. It destroys property, creates a ruckus, and cultivates the misbehaviors of wild teens — all unfair generalizations, to say the least. In truth, there is an extraordinary amount of skill and athleticism that goes into skateboarding.

But that’s not even going far enough in its defense. Skateboarding can be downright beautiful — as much an art form as a sport. And that sheer beauty goes almost completely unheralded outside of skating culture. With that in mind, please aim your faces at these…

Robbyn Magby – 360 Hard Flip Foot Plant

Dustin Blauvelt – Hard Flip Pretzel

Jason Bastien – Rainy Fakie Tre/360 Flip

Jordan Hoffart – Powdery Tre/360 Flip

Jonathan Bastien – Backside 360 Backside Grab

Jason Bastien – Fiery Tre/360 Flip

Ryan Thompson – Fakie Flip Indy Grab

Robbyn Magby – 720 Double Flip

Jason Bastien – Nollie 360 Shuvit Late Flip

Mike Krok – Backside 180 Heel Flip

Jason Bastien – Switch Heelflip Late Fronside Shuvit

Ryan Thompson – Frontside Flip

Hat tip to Adam Shomsky and the guys at BeyondSlowMotion for putting out some amazing skate footage. Go check out their full videos if you get the chance.

Article source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/04/18/beautiful-skateboarding-gifs_n_5155366.html

Curtain Call: Davis Torgerson

Skateboarding in the winter is hard, if not next to impossible and Minnesota is known for it’s long, harsh winters. So, a few years back Davis Torgerson decided to pack it up and hit the road to trade those cold winter days for the warm breezy California vibes.

Joined by childhood friend and filmer Tim Fulton, they cruised around the streets of LA, to gather a few stylish lines for this week’s Curtain Call.

 

Article source: http://www.redbull.com/en/skateboarding/stories/1331645703214/curtain-call-davis-torgerson

Graffiti drone takes street art to new heights


Graffiti drone

Graffiti drone

Not quite ready to replace Banksy

Katsu and The Hole

Katsu, like many graffiti artists, has a preoccupation with
leaving his mark in hard-to-reach places. A few years back he
developed an especially clever tool for the job, modifying a fire
extinguisher to spray larger-than-life tags across entire walls.
(One high-profile
target
: the side of the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los
Angeles in 2012, just as it was opening a hugely publicised
exhibition of graffiti art. The wall was promptly buffed
clean.)

The artist’s latest innovation has the potential to extend his
reach even further. It’s a spray-paint-wielding drone.

Katsu, who gained graffiti fame in the 1990s in New York City,
showed a series of paintings created by the flying machine at the
Silicon Valley Contemporary art fair last weekend. The splotchy
canvasses wouldn’t necessary stop you in your tracks, but the
process by which they were created is entirely new. Katsu pilots
the craft remotely, but every movement is translated through the
machine’s need to keep itself aloft. 

“It’s like 50 per cent me having control and 50 per cent the
drone kind of like saying, ‘I need to turn this way to accomplish
what you want me to do but still maintain myself so I don’t just
fly into the wall and explode.’ Which it does, all the time,” Katsu told
Arthur Holland Michel, of Bard College’s Centre for the Study of
the Drone
. In a sense, the works are co-authored by Katsu and
the drone itself.

Indeed, part of Katsu’s aim with his drone is simply to raise
questions about the transformative effect the machines might have
on art. 

Do it
yourself


How to create light graffiti

“What does it mean that I’m able to be throwing these strokes up
and across a canvas that is 30 feet wide and is suspended 25 feet
in the air?,” he asks. “Painting in these ways just wasn’t
previously possible.” Much in the way that smartphones have become
an extension of our minds, Katsu wonders if drones could someday
serve as a commonplace way to extend our physical selves. Of
course, in that sort of drone-filled future, you’d have to imagine
that cops would have their own drones, too — anti-graffiti UAVs
that chase rogue robot artists through alleyways and across
rooftops, or else just clean-up quadcopters that scan walls for
illegal art and clean them autonomously with high-powered water
weaponry.


Graffiti drone

Graffiti drone

Not quite ready to replace Banksy

Katsu and The Hole

Katsu plans to make the design for his drone open source, so
other artists can experiment with its possibilities. Still, that
doesn’t mean he doesn’t let himself daydream about how his creation
could help him achieve urban ubiquity.

“I do have this little videogame-inspired fantasy of lying in my
bed, sending my drones out my bedroom window, having them render my
tags all over the city and then flying back home to me, like, in my
bed,” he says.

This article originally appeared on Wired.com

Article source: http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2014-04/17/graffiti-drone

Banksy mural: Has mystery graffiti artist finally been unmasked?

His identity has remained a mystery for years – but has this CCTV footage finally unmasked the enigma that is Banksy?

An unidentified hoodie-wearing figure was captured on camera as the infamous graffiti artist’s latest creation was installed in Bristol.

CCTV outside the Broad Plain and Riverside Youth Project in Bristol shows two people unloading equipment from a white van in the early hours of Sunday morning.

The cheeky pair, who are dressed as workmen, were spotted hours before Banksy’s new piece, titled ‘Mobile Lovers’ appeared on the doorway of a rundown street in Bristol.

The image later appeared on Banksy’s website on Monday morning.

The cameras which captured the two men were, ironically, set up to deter graffiti artists.CCTV shows the new Banksy art being installed by a mystery figure early on Sunday morning. (SWNS)Two workmen install the latest Banksy mural near the youth club in Bristol. (SWNS)Hours later the graffiti artwork was removed from the wall using a crowbar by members of the nearby Youth Project.

Bosses are now charging people to see the artwork inside the Broad Plain and Riverside Youth Project.

The cash-strapped boy’s club could now sell the Banksy they wrenched from the wall – and make £100,000 for their youth project in the process.

The financially struggling youth group – who insist Banksy wanted them to have it – plan to sell the work to fund the future of the club, and hope to bring in a six-figure sum.

Teenagers at the youth project today defended the decision to remove the Banksy and sell it.

Jordan Pawell, 19, has been attending the project for 11 years – the last two as a youth worker.

The teenager, who helped remove the art work, said: ‘It is a really good atmosphere here, with lots of activities to do and loads of people to speak to.

‘If we hadn’t brought it in it would have been taken by someone else and sold privately and then nobody would have seen it then.’

Leader of the youth club Dennis Stinchcombe MBE, 58, said: ‘He has given it to the club. He couldn’t give it to us directly as the gates were locked so he put it as close as he could.

‘He has done it to help the right people. I was approached by somebody who knows Banksy very well. He’s an artist himself and he said ‘you need to take that Dennis, get it into that club – it’s what it is meant for’.
‘Banksy never does his street art on pieces of wood – they are always on walls so they can’t be taken away.

‘We need £120,000 to keep going and our fundraising appeal has so far only brought a few thousand pounds.

‘Now we’ve ended up with a Banksy on our doorstep. It is a dream come true. I’m absolutely buzzing.
The Banksy mural is now on display inside the Broad Plain Youth Project in Bristol. (SWNS)
‘We have taken it off the wall carefully, it isn’t damaged at all. If anyone wants to see it they can come in here and put a donation in the box if they feel like it.

‘Somebody was saying it is worth £40,000 but I am hoping for £100,000. It has been authenticated on his website but I am going to try to get it officially done as well.

‘We will let people come and see it in here for a while then get it to Bonhams for valuation.

[Mind-bending flexible sculptures all made from thousands of sheets of PAPER]

[Nice handiwork! Artist stitches eye-watering artworks onto his own PALM]

‘The money will allow us to do everything we could dream of. It will stand us in good stead for the next 120 years.’

Bristol City Council said they were not ’100 per cent sure of the ownership’ of the wall the artwork was attached to.
The ‘Mobile Lovers’ graffiti artwork before it was hauled inside. (SWNS)
Click above to see a gallery of Banksy’s best artwork
But on Wednesday all that was left where it stood was a sign which said: ‘The new Banksy piece is being held in our club to prevent any vandalism or damage being done.

‘You are free to come and view but a small donation will be asked of you. Thanks.’

[Police pounce on would-be Banksy thieves who tried to steal artist's giant balloon from NY roof]

[Cracking exhibition Gromit! Models of famous canine are so popular crowds are turned away]

This latest artwork in Clement Street comes just days after a mum-of-five woke up to find a Banksy mural on the side of her rented house on Sunday.

Stunned Karen Smith, 48, heard voices outside in the early hours but thought nothing of it until she spotted men loading huge screens into a van.

Article source: https://uk.news.yahoo.com/banksy-mural--has-mystery-graffiti-artist-finally-been-unmasked-134546264.html

Springfield community groups take signups for graffiti removal


SPRINGFIELD, Mo. –

The number of graffiti-related calls to Springfield police has steadily declined over the last five years. Springfield police received 415 reports of graffiti in 2009; last year, that number had dropped to 109 reports.

Despite the lower number, it’s still important to cover up graffiti. That’s why a local group is offering free help.

It is fairly common to see graffiti at different places around the city. You might see it on a railroad car, on homes, or on businesses.

Community Partnership of the Ozarks and several youth organizations are volunteering their time and resources to cover it up. Police say, even it is seems harmless, it’s important to report it, because graffiti often breeds more graffiti.

You can sign up online to get it removed. There’s a short questionnaire about what the graffiti looks like, what color it is, and what type of material it is on.

“A lot of it has to do with downtown or underpasses, overpasses, that sort of thing so there are some areas of town where it seems to be really highlighted in that way. Privacy fences are a big deal in neighborhoods as well and kids just tagging for the sake of tagging, and we work very closely with the Springfield Police Department in making sure they check all graffiti sites to make sure they aren’t gang related, because that is important for the police to keep track of those things as well,” said the CPO’s Erica Manahan.

Homeowners and business owners can take advantage of this free program. The groups plan to remove graffiti on April 26.  Volunteers, mostly youth, will paint over the graffiti or sand blast it off.

Police say they check out every report of graffiti they get, regardless of what it says, to make sure that it is not gang related, which it isn’t 99.9 percent of the time.

“A homeowner or business owner can provide the paint if they have a specific color they’re looking for. Otherwise, we offer the paint at very basic colors, black, white, beige, that sort of thing. We try to match it as close as possible, but if they have a specific color certainly they can go and get that and we do the work for free,” said Manahan.

Graffiti is typically a misdemeanor property offense. Clearance rates for the crimes are fairly low because it’s a lower priority for police.

Article source: http://www.ky3.com/news/local/springfield-community-groups-take-signups-for-graffiti-removal/21048998_25537946

City Has a Plan to Combat Growing Graffiti Problem

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RENO, Nev.–It seem like once a week now we are hearing about a neighborhood littered with graffiti. Earlier this month it was a business in Midtown and a few days ago it was a church. But a new effort is underway to make a real difference in our graffiti problem.

Back in August, the city council realized how big of a problem graffiti was becoming so they created a special task-force. For the last several months that group has been working on a fix to the problem. On Wednesday night they presented their resolutions.

“Graffiti is a problem in this community and we are here to address it,” said Tray Abney, Vice Chairman of the Graffiti Task Force.

The Graffiti Task Force told the city council 11 different ways they think the tagging problem can be fixed.

“It’s education, it’s of course enforcement and then it’s eradication,” said Abney.

They said we need a better focus on educating the community about why graffiti is a problem. This is for taggers and for people who let the graffiti go unreported.

“The real key to this is to get rid of it as soon as possible. The longer it stays up, the more problems it causes,” said Abney.

They’re proposing an “adopt-a-block” program. People would take responsibility for an area and make sure graffiti gets cleaned up. Also the police want businesses to sign waivers so crews don’t have to ask permission to clean up graffiti.

“Then when it happens, we have the ability to have it removed right away and not try to obtain a waiver,” said Deputy Chief Mac Venzon with the Reno Police Department.

Police already arrest taggers but they want harsher penalties and wider reaching laws. Ones that expand the definition of graffiti. A major problem with the law right now is that if an officer does not witness the vandalism, no arrest can be made.

“It’s an activity that a small population does engage in but can have a big impact on the property owners and the community’s image,” said Reno City Councilwoman Jenny Brekhus.

The city council approved all 11 anti-graffiti resolutions. Some of them will be implemented in the coming weeks. Others, like the education aspect, will take some time to get up and running.

Article source: http://www.kolotv.com/home/headlines/City-Has-a-Plan-to-Combat-Growing-Graffiti-Problem-255743331.html

This Open Source Graffiti Drone Will Give Cops Nightmares

Graffiti artist Katsu recently debuted a series of paintings made with a spray-paint-wielding drone. Photos by Katsu and The Hole

The splotchy canvasses wouldn’t necessary stop you in your tracks, but the process by which they were created is entirely new. Katsu pilots the craft remotely, but every movement is translated through the machine’s need to keep itself aloft. Photos by Katsu and The Hole

Part of Katsu’s aim with his drone is simply to raise questions about the transformative effect the machines might have on art. Photos by Katsu and The Hole

“What does it mean that I’m able to be throwing these strokes up and across a canvas that is 30 feet wide and is suspended 25 feet in the air?,” he asks. “Painting in these ways just wasn’t previously possible.” Photos by Katsu and The Hole

You have to wonder, though, if cops will someday respond with anti-graffiti drones of their own. Photos by Katsu and The Hole

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Graffiti artist Katsu recently debuted a series of paintings made with a spray-paint-wielding drone. Photos by Katsu and The Hole

The splotchy canvasses wouldn’t necessary stop you in your tracks, but the process by which they were created is entirely new. Katsu pilots the craft remotely, but every movement is translated through the machine’s need to keep itself aloft. Photos by Katsu and The Hole

Part of Katsu’s aim with his drone is simply to raise questions about the transformative effect the machines might have on art. Photos by Katsu and The Hole

“What does it mean that I’m able to be throwing these strokes up and across a canvas that is 30 feet wide and is suspended 25 feet in the air?,” he asks. “Painting in these ways just wasn’t previously possible.” Photos by Katsu and The Hole

You have to wonder, though, if cops will someday respond with anti-graffiti drones of their own. Photos by Katsu and The Hole

Katsu, like many graffiti artists, has a preoccupation with leaving his mark in hard-to-reach places. A few years back he developed an especially clever tool for the job, modifying a fire extinguisher to spray larger-than-life tags across entire walls. (One high-profile target: the side of the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles in 2012, just as it was opening a hugely publicized exhibition of graffiti art. The wall was promptly buffed clean.)

The artist’s latest innovation has the potential to extend his reach even further. It’s a spray-paint-wielding drone.

Katsu, who gained graffiti fame in the 1990s in New York City, showed a series of paintings created by the flying machine at the Silicon Valley Contemporary art fair last weekend. The splotchy canvasses wouldn’t necessary stop you in your tracks, but the process by which they were created is entirely new. Katsu pilots the craft remotely, but every movement is translated through the machine’s need to keep itself aloft.

“It’s like 50 percent me having control and 50 percent the drone kind of like saying, ‘I need to turn this way to accomplish what you want me to do but still maintain myself so I don’t just fly into the wall and explode.’ Which it does, all the time,” Katsu told Arthur Holland Michel, of Bard College’s Center for the Study of the Drone. In a sense, the works are co-authored by Katsu and the drone itself.

Indeed, part of Katsu’s aim with his drone is simply to raise questions about the transformative effect the machines might have on art.

“What does it mean that I’m able to be throwing these strokes up and across a canvas that is 30 feet wide and is suspended 25 feet in the air?,” he asks. “Painting in these ways just wasn’t previously possible.” Much in the way that smartphones have become an extension of our minds, Katsu wonders if drones could someday serve as a commonplace way to extend our physical selves. Of course, in that sort of drone-filled future, you’d have to imagine that cops would have their own drones, too–anti-graffiti UAVs that chase rogue robot artists through alleyways and across rooftops, or else just clean-up quadcopters that scan walls for illegal art and clean them autonomously with high-powered water weaponry.

Katsu plans to make the design for his drone open source, so other artists can experiment with its possibilities. Still, that doesn’t mean he doesn’t let himself daydream about how his creation could help him achieve urban ubiquity.

“I do have this little videogame-inspired fantasy of lying in my bed, sending my drones out my bedroom window, having them render my tags all over the city and then flying back home to me, like, in my bed,” he says.

Image: Katsu

Image courtesy Katsu and The Hole

Article source: http://www.wired.com/2014/04/a-nightmare-for-cops-a-drone-that-paints-graffiti/