Skateboarding Shoes

When Will They Make Better Skateboarding Shoes?

skateboard shoes,skate shoes,dc shoes,nike skateboarding shoes,vans shoes,skateboarding shoes
I have been troubled with the notion that skateboarding shoes need much improvement.  I am realizing that a good skateboard obsession requires new skate shoes just about as often as you need a new deck.  What’s up with skateboard shoes lately?  I have seen others try all kinds of different shoes but at the end of the day the sport wears out your shoes faster than Fred Flintstone’s feet wear out from braking in his floorless car.

There has been much improvement in terms of skateboard technology such as lighter and more reliable decks, polyurethane wheels, and frictionless bearings, but where are we with grip tape and shoes?

I spoke with my sons who are competitive skaters and I suggested that I develop a pair of shoes that came with the grip tape on the sole (imagine this on a wood top board – the grip on the shoes, not on the deck?)

Skateboarding Shoes

Brand New Vans Shoe Torn After Only 4 Minutes!

I’m sure the combination of gritty sand on your soles and braking after doing tricks is the main cause for premature sole wear but what about other wear and tear on other parts of the shoe? (see photo below)?

I’m sure Vans, DC, and now Nike can come up with a winning formula for making better skateboard shoes.  Oh yeah almost forgot to mention that we don’t see the problem of worn skateboarding shoes with longboarders, only with those who skate short decks.

 

 

 

 

When will they make better skateboarding shoes?

How to Paint a Skateboard

How to Paint a Skateboard Professionally at Home

Hey folks if you are trying to figure out how to paint a skateboard professionally jump in the blog and comment or criticize in the comments section below.  This article is meant to solve the problem of those decks you trip over in the shed that the kids don’t want anymore.

I’ve read several similar articles but they don’t go into detail more than “sand board, then prime”.  I wanted to provide more detail as to what sandpaper to use, etc.  Please consider that these tips are for the hobbyist and produce as much a “professional” result as possible, but do not equate to a professional skateboard manufacturer’s methods.  The point being that skateboards, in order to gain speed and agility, require the lightest weight possible in order to defy physics.  Believe it or not, painting a deck in your backyard can produce great looking results, but manufacturers take great lengths to keep the manufacturing process as controlled as possible in order to apply the minimum required amount of paint.  Applying too much paint will increase the deck’s weight and even if you were to increase the weight by only one gram, that would be all too noticeable to a professional skater.  I’m sure Tony Hawk and Shaun White are past the stage of backyard shed projects.

 

how to paint a skateboard

The “Before” Shot

how to paint a skateboard

The Other “Before” Shot

Unless you can guarantee that you will not sand off too much of the underside art to the detriment of the wood, and apply the exact same amount of paint as previously applied, please ensure that if you are repainting the deck of a pro skater that you set the expectation.

 

Recommendations

First you’ll need a decent workspace, whether it be a shed or garage or even outdoors.  If you intend to work outdoors, careful when spray painting in a breeze.

 

You’ll also need some work clothes.  You will get dirty and unless your clothes and workspace has been previously approved by your partner, spouse, or girlfriend, you could find yourself in trouble and ultimately skating alone.

 

You’ll need to have adequate clean up materials such as a wet cloth to wipe excess paint, a paint area covered by a sheet of cardboard or dropcloth.

 

Also, though these steps took me about an hour to complete, the whole process took about three days to complete, allowing for the primer and paint to dry sufficiently between steps.  Also, sanding by hand is not recommended.  I highly recommend the use of an electrical sander as it will sand the surface uniformly without creating valleys or carve lines in.

 

Before beginning, do make sure that the board you are restoring is in fact repairable and that the plies have not separated.

how to paint a skateboard

Unrepairable Deck – The Plies Have Separated

 

Tools & Equipment for How to Paint a Skateboard

  • An X-Acto or surgical knife
  • A putty knife – a metal one, not a plastic one
  • A blow dryer or paint heat gun
  • 40 grit sand paper
  • 150 grit sand paper
  • 220 grit sand paper
  • An electric sander – with protective glasses and a dust mask
  • Wood filler
  • Acrylic aerosol primer
  • Acrylic aerosol paint
  • Aerosol lacquer or Varathane
  • Mom, dad, or the babysitter’s permission and approval before proceeding

 

Steps to Prepare for How to Paint a Skateboard

  1.  Take a photo of the “before” deck top and bottom for sake of posterity.  If you can, weigh the board so you have a reference as to the weight of the removed paint and the paint you’re to add.
  2. Using the knife, lift the grip tape at the end of the board and begin peeling

    how to paint a skateboard

    Remove the Grip Tape

  3. If required, use the heat gun or blow dryer to warm the grip tape glue in order to facilitate the peeling process.  Removing the grip tape should take between three and seven minutes.
  4. Using the sander and 40 grit paper, proceed to remove the graphic from the bottom of the deck.  Be patient as this can take 20 minutes.  Apply a lot of pressure on the sander but avoid digging or carving into the wood with the edge of the sander.

    how to paint a skateboard

    Sanding the Deck

  5. Once the graphic has been removed, re-sand with a 150 grit paper in order to smooth out the wood.  This step should take no more than five minutes.
  6. Repair the board as needed using a carpenter quality wood filler paste.  Wood filler is available in many colours and you can even collect some of the sawdust from the previous step and mix it in.  Apply liberal amounts of filler and don’t worry about getting it perfect.  You are not icing a cake.  The important point to remember is not to over work the filler.  Put it on, let it dry, then you will re-sand.  This step should take five minutes.  Then wait 24 hours before sanding the filler.
    how to paint a skateboard

    Fill in the Pressure Cracks

    how to paint a skateboard

    Some Repairs are Needed – Apply Wood Filler

    how to paint a skateboard

    Apply Wood Filler to the Deck

  7. Re-sand the repaired spots with 150 grit paper.

    how to paint a skateboard

    The Wood Filler After Sanding – Looks Pretty Good

  8. Using a damp (not wet) cloth, wipe any excess sawdust from the deck and wait about fifteen minutes.  Next is the real how to p
  9. For the primer, ensure you have properly mixed it.  Apply the primer to each surface of the deck.  I used a paint brush but try finding an aerosol primer.  The trouble with brushes is that you may apply too much primer in certain areas.
  10. how to paint a skateboard

    Apply the Primer

  11. Wait for the primer to dry (about 30 minutes) and re-sand with 150 grit paper.  Do not resand the primer off to the point you will see the wood grain.  Just provide a light sanding to remove any blistering or bubbles from the primer.  You may see the wood through the primer, this is ok.
  12. Before painting the deck, again wipe extra primer dust from the deck with a damp cloth and again wait fifteen minutes before painting.
  13. Shake the aerosol primer can for at least two full minutes.  Hold the can about ten inches away from the deck and spray very lightly until the paint covers the entire surface.  Aerosol cans cause drips and bubbles so if this occurs, wait for drying and resanding, do not overpaint or try to fix wet paint.
    how to paint a skateboard

    Getting Ready to Spray the First Coat

    how to paint a skateboard

    First Coat Applied

    how to paint a skateboard

    First Coat Applied

  14. Wait 24 hours.  Seriously.  This is the most crucial step to allow the paint to dry.
  15. Sand the painted deck with 220 grit paper and again wipe with damp cloth and wait fifteen minutes

 

Thanks for reading How to Paint a Skateboard

 

 

skateboard dock shoes

My New Shoes

I go through a pair of skate shoes about every three weeks.  My parents are getting annoyed but I got me a summer job mowing lawns so I’ve been pretty much buying all my equipment this summer.

skateboard dock shoes

 

Murals to transform graffiti-ridden train trestles in Jersey City – The Jersey Journal

Train trestles, which have always been the makeshift canvas of graffiti artists, will be transformed into inviting “welcome to Jersey City” murals in an agreement reached by Jersey City and Conrail, city officials said.

The agreement with Conrail was sought after community groups, in particular, the South Greenville Neighborhood Association, pointed out to city officials that graffiti on Garfield Avenue trestles that greets commuters as they enter and exit Jersey City from Bayonne has been a chronic problem.

“We are excited to expand our mural project to include the train trestles that are located throughout the city and which are viewed by hundreds of thousands of residents and visitors daily,” Jersey City Mayor Steve Fulop said. “The train trestles for years have been a site of graffiti and we saw this as an opportunity to display the creativity of our arts community while also welcoming residents and visitors to Jersey City.”

City officials say this program builds upon a successful program in which 22 murals were created across the city.

The majority of the murals will be painted by Paws21, who was born in Jersey City and whose career spans two decades. Examples of Paws21′s work can be seen on the corner of Bergen Avenue and Reed Street, as well as the Super Bowl wall on Christopher Columbus that was done last November.

Under the agreement with Conrail, graffiti will also be removed from several historic retaining walls. Sue One, who is also a local artist, will begin work on the Grand Street retaining wall.

City officials are still seeking proposals for the retaining walls on Newark and Pacific avenues.

City officials said the following trestles and retaining walls are covered under the agreement:

Grand Street: painting on both sides of trestle;

Garfield Avenue: painting on both sides of trestle;

Pacific Avenue: painting on concrete north retaining wall and graffiti removal on south retaining wall

Montgomery Street: graffiti removal on north and south retaining walls;

Newark Avenue: painting on east trestle side and north and south concrete retaining walls
Johnston Avenue: graffiti removal on north retaining wall

Article source: http://www.nj.com/jjournal-news/index.ssf/2014/10/deal_reached_to_tranform_trest.html

Murals to transform graffiti-ridden train trestles in Jersey City – The Jersey Journal

Train trestles, which have always been the makeshift canvas of graffiti artists, will be transformed into inviting “welcome to Jersey City” murals in an agreement reached by Jersey City and Conrail, city officials said.

The agreement with Conrail was sought after community groups, in particular, the South Greenville Neighborhood Association, pointed out to city officials that graffiti on Garfield Avenue trestles that greets commuters as they enter and exit Jersey City from Bayonne has been a chronic problem.

“We are excited to expand our mural project to include the train trestles that are located throughout the city and which are viewed by hundreds of thousands of residents and visitors daily,” Jersey City Mayor Steve Fulop said. “The train trestles for years have been a site of graffiti and we saw this as an opportunity to display the creativity of our arts community while also welcoming residents and visitors to Jersey City.”

City officials say this program builds upon a successful program in which 22 murals were created across the city.

The majority of the murals will be painted by Paws21, who was born in Jersey City and whose career spans two decades. Examples of Paws21′s work can be seen on the corner of Bergen Avenue and Reed Street, as well as the Super Bowl wall on Christopher Columbus that was done last November.

Under the agreement with Conrail, graffiti will also be removed from several historic retaining walls. Sue One, who is also a local artist, will begin work on the Grand Street retaining wall.

City officials are still seeking proposals for the retaining walls on Newark and Pacific avenues.

City officials said the following trestles and retaining walls are covered under the agreement:

Grand Street: painting on both sides of trestle;

Garfield Avenue: painting on both sides of trestle;

Pacific Avenue: painting on concrete north retaining wall and graffiti removal on south retaining wall

Montgomery Street: graffiti removal on north and south retaining walls;

Newark Avenue: painting on east trestle side and north and south concrete retaining walls
Johnston Avenue: graffiti removal on north retaining wall

Article source: http://www.nj.com/jjournal-news/index.ssf/2014/10/deal_reached_to_tranform_trest.html

Murals to transform graffiti-ridden train trestles in Jersey City – The Jersey Journal

Train trestles, which have always been the makeshift canvas of graffiti artists, will be transformed into inviting “welcome to Jersey City” murals in an agreement reached by Jersey City and Conrail, city officials said.

The agreement with Conrail was sought after community groups, in particular, the South Greenville Neighborhood Association, pointed out to city officials that graffiti on Garfield Avenue trestles that greets commuters as they enter and exit Jersey City from Bayonne has been a chronic problem.

“We are excited to expand our mural project to include the train trestles that are located throughout the city and which are viewed by hundreds of thousands of residents and visitors daily,” Jersey City Mayor Steve Fulop said. “The train trestles for years have been a site of graffiti and we saw this as an opportunity to display the creativity of our arts community while also welcoming residents and visitors to Jersey City.”

City officials say this program builds upon a successful program in which 22 murals were created across the city.

The majority of the murals will be painted by Paws21, who was born in Jersey City and whose career spans two decades. Examples of Paws21′s work can be seen on the corner of Bergen Avenue and Reed Street, as well as the Super Bowl wall on Christopher Columbus that was done last November.

Under the agreement with Conrail, graffiti will also be removed from several historic retaining walls. Sue One, who is also a local artist, will begin work on the Grand Street retaining wall.

City officials are still seeking proposals for the retaining walls on Newark and Pacific avenues.

City officials said the following trestles and retaining walls are covered under the agreement:

Grand Street: painting on both sides of trestle;

Garfield Avenue: painting on both sides of trestle;

Pacific Avenue: painting on concrete north retaining wall and graffiti removal on south retaining wall

Montgomery Street: graffiti removal on north and south retaining walls;

Newark Avenue: painting on east trestle side and north and south concrete retaining walls
Johnston Avenue: graffiti removal on north retaining wall

Article source: http://www.nj.com/jjournal-news/index.ssf/2014/10/deal_reached_to_tranform_trest.html

Banksy proves arrest rumour wrong with new graffiti art – which is vandalised …

Street artist Banksy put rumours of his arrest behind him by producing a new spray-painted mural – which was immediately vandalised.

His latest work cropped up in his home city of Bristol yesterday but was splattered with dark blue paint this morning.

The elusive paint wizard’s handiwork is in the docks area of the city and parodies Dutch painter Johannes Vermeer’s Girl with a Pearl Earring.

The stencil art cleverly incorporates an alarm box as the model’s earring and is called ‘Girl with a Pierced Eardrum’.

The artist’s last work in the city was called Mobile Lovers.

It sparked a row with Bristol City Council claiming it owned the work as it was on their land.

Banksy settled the spat by writing to Broad Plain Boys’ Club saying it was theirs.

The club sold it to a private collector for £403,000.

The internet was awash with rumours yesterday that Banksy had been arrested.

The talk was sparked by a hoax news story circulated on Twitter.

Article source: http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/banksy-proves-arrest-rumour-wrong-4472528

Banksy proves arrest rumour wrong with new graffiti art – which is vandalised …

Street artist Banksy put rumours of his arrest behind him by producing a new spray-painted mural – which was immediately vandalised.

His latest work cropped up in his home city of Bristol yesterday but was splattered with dark blue paint this morning.

The elusive paint wizard’s handiwork is in the docks area of the city and parodies Dutch painter Johannes Vermeer’s Girl with a Pearl Earring.

The stencil art cleverly incorporates an alarm box as the model’s earring and is called ‘Girl with a Pierced Eardrum’.

The artist’s last work in the city was called Mobile Lovers.

It sparked a row with Bristol City Council claiming it owned the work as it was on their land.

Banksy settled the spat by writing to Broad Plain Boys’ Club saying it was theirs.

The club sold it to a private collector for £403,000.

The internet was awash with rumours yesterday that Banksy had been arrested.

The talk was sparked by a hoax news story circulated on Twitter.

Article source: http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/banksy-proves-arrest-rumour-wrong-4472528

Banksy proves arrest rumour wrong with new graffiti art – which is vandalised …

Street artist Banksy put rumours of his arrest behind him by producing a new spray-painted mural – which was immediately vandalised.

His latest work cropped up in his home city of Bristol yesterday but was splattered with dark blue paint this morning.

The elusive paint wizard’s handiwork is in the docks area of the city and parodies Dutch painter Johannes Vermeer’s Girl with a Pearl Earring.

The stencil art cleverly incorporates an alarm box as the model’s earring and is called ‘Girl with a Pierced Eardrum’.

The artist’s last work in the city was called Mobile Lovers.

It sparked a row with Bristol City Council claiming it owned the work as it was on their land.

Banksy settled the spat by writing to Broad Plain Boys’ Club saying it was theirs.

The club sold it to a private collector for £403,000.

The internet was awash with rumours yesterday that Banksy had been arrested.

The talk was sparked by a hoax news story circulated on Twitter.

Article source: http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/banksy-proves-arrest-rumour-wrong-4472528

Amherst to remove graffiti at skatepark

While the town decided at its Monday committee of the whole meeting to remove graffiti left at the skatepark last week, it’s also going to check with other municipalities regarding their skateparks and whether they allow some form of graffiti there.

“When it came to our attention last week we first consulted with police and then we met randomly with some of the users. Unanimously, the users told us that graffiti art is something they’d welcome in the park,” recreation director Bill Schurman told council. “We would like to see what others are doing and then come back to council for some direction and dialog.”

While Schurman is going to check with other municipal units, council is divided on whether any graffiti art should be permitted at the park.

Coun. George Baker said council considered this when the park was being built several years ago and the decision was made not to allow graffiti. He said he talked to the project’s major sponsor, the Amherst Lions Club, and was told that organization is also against graffiti at the park.

The Lions Club provided $25,000 toward the $369,000 park that opened in October 2010.

“At the time the park was built we said no graffiti and I don’t think we should change that. We can’t flip flop on this,” Baker said.

Baker said if graffiti is allowed it will get out of control and spread to the walls of the Amherst Stadium and other nearby properties.

While town staff said there’s nothing in previous council minutes regarding a graffiti policy, Coun. Robert Bird said he remembers the discussion and the recommendation of council was not to allow graffiti on the property.

Bird said the company that built the park, NewLine Skateparks, recommended not allowing graffiti on the property.

A couple of councilors suggested allowing some limited graffiti on one inside wall of the park that would not include anything offensive.

Deputy Mayor Lisa Emery questioned who would determine what’s appropriate and what’s considered art?

Schurman said he would bring what he finds back to council so it can make a decision on how to proceed.

darrell.cole@tc.tc

Twitter: @ADNdarrell

 

Article source: http://www.cumberlandnewsnow.com/News/Local/2014-10-21/article-3910751/Amherst-to-remove-graffiti-at-skatepark/1

Amherst to remove graffiti at skatepark

While the town decided at its Monday committee of the whole meeting to remove graffiti left at the skatepark last week, it’s also going to check with other municipalities regarding their skateparks and whether they allow some form of graffiti there.

“When it came to our attention last week we first consulted with police and then we met randomly with some of the users. Unanimously, the users told us that graffiti art is something they’d welcome in the park,” recreation director Bill Schurman told council. “We would like to see what others are doing and then come back to council for some direction and dialog.”

While Schurman is going to check with other municipal units, council is divided on whether any graffiti art should be permitted at the park.

Coun. George Baker said council considered this when the park was being built several years ago and the decision was made not to allow graffiti. He said he talked to the project’s major sponsor, the Amherst Lions Club, and was told that organization is also against graffiti at the park.

The Lions Club provided $25,000 toward the $369,000 park that opened in October 2010.

“At the time the park was built we said no graffiti and I don’t think we should change that. We can’t flip flop on this,” Baker said.

Baker said if graffiti is allowed it will get out of control and spread to the walls of the Amherst Stadium and other nearby properties.

While town staff said there’s nothing in previous council minutes regarding a graffiti policy, Coun. Robert Bird said he remembers the discussion and the recommendation of council was not to allow graffiti on the property.

Bird said the company that built the park, NewLine Skateparks, recommended not allowing graffiti on the property.

A couple of councilors suggested allowing some limited graffiti on one inside wall of the park that would not include anything offensive.

Deputy Mayor Lisa Emery questioned who would determine what’s appropriate and what’s considered art?

Schurman said he would bring what he finds back to council so it can make a decision on how to proceed.

darrell.cole@tc.tc

Twitter: @ADNdarrell

 

Article source: http://www.cumberlandnewsnow.com/News/Local/2014-10-21/article-3910751/Amherst-to-remove-graffiti-at-skatepark/1

Amherst to remove graffiti at skatepark

While the town decided at its Monday committee of the whole meeting to remove graffiti left at the skatepark last week, it’s also going to check with other municipalities regarding their skateparks and whether they allow some form of graffiti there.

“When it came to our attention last week we first consulted with police and then we met randomly with some of the users. Unanimously, the users told us that graffiti art is something they’d welcome in the park,” recreation director Bill Schurman told council. “We would like to see what others are doing and then come back to council for some direction and dialog.”

While Schurman is going to check with other municipal units, council is divided on whether any graffiti art should be permitted at the park.

Coun. George Baker said council considered this when the park was being built several years ago and the decision was made not to allow graffiti. He said he talked to the project’s major sponsor, the Amherst Lions Club, and was told that organization is also against graffiti at the park.

The Lions Club provided $25,000 toward the $369,000 park that opened in October 2010.

“At the time the park was built we said no graffiti and I don’t think we should change that. We can’t flip flop on this,” Baker said.

Baker said if graffiti is allowed it will get out of control and spread to the walls of the Amherst Stadium and other nearby properties.

While town staff said there’s nothing in previous council minutes regarding a graffiti policy, Coun. Robert Bird said he remembers the discussion and the recommendation of council was not to allow graffiti on the property.

Bird said the company that built the park, NewLine Skateparks, recommended not allowing graffiti on the property.

A couple of councilors suggested allowing some limited graffiti on one inside wall of the park that would not include anything offensive.

Deputy Mayor Lisa Emery questioned who would determine what’s appropriate and what’s considered art?

Schurman said he would bring what he finds back to council so it can make a decision on how to proceed.

darrell.cole@tc.tc

Twitter: @ADNdarrell

 

Article source: http://www.cumberlandnewsnow.com/News/Local/2014-10-21/article-3910751/Amherst-to-remove-graffiti-at-skatepark/1

Why doesn’t the TTC run trains marked with graffiti?

ttc graffitiWhen a photo of a heavily graffiti tagged Toronto subway train was posted to Reddit on Sunday, it came as something of a surprise to the TTC. Since David Gunn’s tenure as general manager in the late 1990s, the transit provider has had a strict policy of keeping heavily vandalized trains out of sight.

“It’s a bit of the broken window theory,” says TTC spokesman Brad Ross. “We will take trains out of service, or buses, or streetcars if it has been significantly vandalized, and the reason for that is we don’t want it to become viral.”

When Gunn took over as president of the New York City Transit Authority in 1984, graffiti was so widespread that some trains were coated inside and out with tags. Management had spent decades and countless dollars cleaning and periodically repainting trains.

As part of Gunn’s wider rehabilitation of the New York subway, he instituted a policy of pulling tagged trains from service, even during rush hour, a concept he brought to Toronto in 1995. The theory goes that if damage and graffiti become normal for riders, it could lead to more severe acts of vandalism.

Gunn’s policy hasn’t eliminated graffiti on the Toronto subway, however.

“Last year we had around 70 reports. That’s everything: inside trains, on vehicles, stations, all TTC property,” says Brad Ross. “We don’t include ‘scratchiti‘ in that, but [it's] Sharpies and spray paint or whatever marker.”

As you might expect, tagging a subway train is risky business. The third rail, the source of the high-voltage electricity used by trains, is always live and tunnels are in constant use, even after the end of scheduled service. People die trying to paint trains.

In the case of last weekend’s tagged train, Ross says the incident likely occurred as a result of track work between Bloor and Eglinton stations. Instead of being kept in a fenced and closely watched yard overnight Saturday, the train was stored on the tracks somewhere near Finch station.

Staff didn’t notice the damage and the train was allowed to enter service, Ross says. It was pulled and an investigation launched soon after. It took several hours to clean with solvents, but the train is now back in use on Line 1.

“People shouldn’t have to look at vandalized vehicles for which they own and pay for, and so we have an obligation to ensure they are kept clean and presentable for the people of Toronto.”

Photo by Peter Muzyka

Chris Bateman is a staff writer at blogTO. Follow him on Twitter at @chrisbateman.

Article source: http://www.blogto.com/city/2014/10/why_doesnt_the_ttc_run_trains_marked_with_graffiti/